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Herschel Island 2013: Country music and film making

(Photo: B. Radosavljevic) Stefanie measuring coordinates of the headwall edge. Juliane and Michael are taking ice samples below while being filmed by the TV team.(Photo: B. Radosavljevic) Stefanie measuring coordinates of the headwall edge. Juliane and Michael are taking ice samples below while being filmed by the TV team.Tuesday, 23rd of July 2013
 
We have just finished listening to country music played live by Hugues, Isla and Richard, the head ranger for Herschel Island. Meanwhile we were enjoying a super delicious, freshly baked apple crumble from Isla.
 
Everyone is quite tired and it is again 3 am. Some field books got wet due to intense mud in the slump and later heavy rain, so that now we are still busy copying all data from the field books into save Excel files.
 
Today the German- Canadian TV team filming the production about the North West Passage joint us at the slump.
 
They want to get information about permafrost from us and about science in general. We are curious to see the result after hours and hours of filming, keeping in mind that in the end only 10 minutes of TV time will be dedicated to permafrost.
 
(Photo: Photo U. Bastian) Live music with the midnight sun outside after a long and hard working field day (Photo: Photo U. Bastian) Live music with the midnight sun outside after a long and hard working field day. According to the film crew the film material to actual air time of the documentary usually is about a 40:1 ratio.
 
Unfortunately there was no way to dress up today, after spending the last three weeks without a shower or a washing machine, spending a lot of time just in slumps, permafrost holes or sampling mud on the boat.
 
But we were dressed with a smile, and an even bigger smile when the film crew was covered in mud to their hips after spending a day with us in the field.
 
We took massive ground ice samples today from the slump headwall using a chainsaw and an ice axe, took our GPS measurements of the recent headwall and got all data and samples from my devices.
 
(Photo: Photo U. Bastian) Stefanie downloads photos from the time lapse camera that was taking pictures every 30 minutes of the slump headwall. (Photo: Photo U. Bastian) Stefanie downloads photos from the time lapse camera that was taking pictures every 30 minutes of the slump headwall. We can already see now, that the headwall of the slump is retreating over 6-10 meters in the thawing summer months from about May to October.
 
Gute Nacht!
 
 
 
Written by Stefanie
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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